Russian children to be taught how to survive nuclear attack

Schoolchildren being taught how to provide first aid (Picture: Getty)

Vladimir Putin’s threats against Ukraine and its Westers allies have awakened fear from the Cold War, so much so that children in Russia will be trained on how to protect themselves in a nuclear attack, it has been reported.

As part of the latest changes to the national school curriculum, students will learn about ‘the combat properties and damaging effects of mass destruction weapons, as well as methods of protection against them’.

‘The Fundamentals of Security and Defence of the Motherland’ will be rolled out in schools across the country from as early as September, according to an update on a portal about teachers.

Children will also be taught about how to protect themselves in emergencies such as natural, man-made and biological-social nature disasters and a military threat.

Providing first aid to patients with external bleeding, injuries to large parts of the body, burns, frostbite and poisoning will also be included in the curriculum.

Other elements include basic military training, how to use a Kalashnikov rifle and hand grenades.

Children take part in a first aid training while touring the Russian Defence Ministry pavilion at Russia Expo (Picture: AFP)

The Russian president approved the changes last August, introducing the security and defence course in school.

This will serve as a sobering backdrop to every lesson amid whispers that the war in Ukraine may spill over into the rest of Europe.

It all goes hand in hand with Putin’s claims that Western support for Ukraine has escalated the threat of a direct confrontation between Russia and Nato countries.

In September 2023, the Kremlin deployed tactical nuclear weapons to ally Belarus – but vowed not to use them.

But former Russian president Dmitry Medvedev has made repeated threats that his government may use its arsenal if Ukraine’s counteroffensive succeeds and Russia territory is seized.

Get in touch with our news team by emailing us at webnews@metro.co.uk.

For more stories like this, check our news page.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Follow by Email
LinkedIn
LinkedIn
Share